Six Feet Under Poster

Six Feet Under (2001)

Comedy  
Rayting:   8.7/10 127K votes
Country: USA
Language: English

A chronicle of the lives of a dysfunctional family who run an independent funeral home in Los Angeles.

Episode Guide

Season 5

Season 4

Season 3

Season 2

Season 1

Best Six Feet Under Episodes

Top 20 (Ranked)

August 21, 2005star9.9 8827 votesS5E12 Everyone's Waiting
August 7, 2005star9.6 2434 votesS5E10 All Alone
July 31, 2005star9.5 2036 votesS5E9 Ecotone
June 1, 2003star9.2 1529 votesS3E13 I'm Sorry, I'm Lost
June 2, 2002star9.2 1519 votesS2E13 The Last Time
August 14, 2005star9.1 1618 votesS5E11 Static
September 12, 2004star9.1 1480 votesS4E12 Untitled
June 13, 2004star9.0 1488 votesS4E1 Falling Into Place
May 19, 2002star9.0 1429 votesS2E12 I'll Take You
July 18, 2004star8.9 1925 votesS4E5 That's My Dog
August 19, 2001star8.9 1633 votesS1E12 A Private Life
May 11, 2003star8.9 1258 votesS3E11 Death Works Overtime
June 3, 2001star8.8 2867 votesS1E1 Pilot
August 19, 2001star8.8 1578 votesS1E13 Knock, Knock
July 25, 2005star8.8 1278 votesS5E8 Singing For Our Lives
July 8, 2001star8.7 1760 votesS1E6 The Room
March 23, 2003star8.7 1345 votesS3E4 Nobody Sleeps
June 27, 2005star8.7 1241 votesS5E4 Time Flies
July 29, 2001star8.6 1596 votesS1E9 Life's Too Short

Six Feet Under Trailer

User Reviews

stonedonkies 22 August 2005

Six Feet Under is meticulous, beautiful, daunting, and powerful. One way or another, it will connect with you, perhaps in places you didn't expect and aren't willing to expose. At times wrenching, at other times cathartic, but always staring back at you knowingly, this show stands head and shoulders above the advertising-driven fare that clogs network TV with mediocrity, token minorities, and jarring commercial breaks. It changed the way I view television, and I recommend it to anyone who's tired of the same old crap.

After watching the series finale (which I won't spoil, don't worry), I sat in bed, unable to sleep. After poring over everything I'd seen over the past season, it struck me that SFU is the most raw and personal television show I've ever seen. Even more, there are no stand-alone episodes for easy syndication. Every single installment is part of a huge puzzle, or a few more miles on the Fisher family's road. I've always found Peter Krause to be a disappointingly flat performer, which is unfortunate because his character anchors the show, but the other actors are often transcendent. Regardless, every one of them radiates with a sometimes painfully familiar pathos. The cinematography is also staggering sometimes, taken from film rather than typical 3-camera TV work. If that's not enough, the music they choose to score the episodes is almost symbiotic; it seems ingrained into the film itself, even when you know it was just licensed.

This is not really a family-friendly show, though, encompassing profanity, nudity, violence, drug use, "alternative lifestyles" ... So in other words, it's just like real life. And despite the interpersonal conflicts that fuel the narrative to the point of melodrama, the show isn't afraid to pause every once in a while and let the show communicate without dialogue.

I feel very gratified to have watched SFU, and I've never felt that way about any other show in the almost-27 years I've been alive. Hopefully it will start a trend, if only on premium cable.

alexkolokotronis 1 February 2009

When using superlatives with this show it is totally fair. This show does something all other movies, shows, etc cannot do: it can safely apply any genre and still function as a deep and very entertaining show. As everybody episode goes by the show only becomes more addictive. It taps into almost every aspect of life. Every emotion is shown; love, hate, forgiveness, triumph and the list goes on and on. In fact this show depicts life the most realistically. The strangeness and peculiarity of the many themes perfectly displays the confusion in life and how it affects us. The show displays confusion in the clearest way making it almost impossible not to some how relate to the characters in the show. Not to mention also the series ends on one finest note you will ever see not just satisfying the viewer but taking the show to a level far and above anything else I have ever seen before. This show does the impossible twice over.

automation21 31 May 2002

And I rarely even watch television. I'm a book person.

Not since the "X-Files" has a TV show been so intriguing. Every time I watch an episode, I am struck back be depth of storyline, the intricate characters and the left-of-the-middle storytelling. I literally cannot control myself from discussing each new episode with (bored) family members.

SFU is a very introverted show - it resembles more a book or play than television. While the latter is extroverted and relies on events happening to characters (eg: the overboard emergencies of ER or the romances in soaps) to carry the story, Six Feet Under wants to communicate the deepest feelings and ideals of the people on screen. As a result, it not only stimulates the mind but also helps us analyse ourselves.

In the hands of any other creators, this would make for a very dull hour of suburban spirituality, but Allan Ball's menagerie of ghosts, (past characters influencing the present) trippy daydream sequences, surreal atmosphere and some wicked black humour make for a very entertaining show and sell what would otherwise be a marketing disaster to the masses. On top of that, every component from acting to directing to screenplay is flawless. (the dead boy's ghost in "a private life" still chills me to the bone).

Most, of all I admire the characters: some of the most complex and enchanting creatures ever to grace the idiot box. After a few episodes, they feel like a second family.

While I do have my complaints about the amount of obscenity, (I can swear that sometimes the writers want to offend us just for fun) I have to give my show the highest commendations. There are, of course, moments when I feel like throwing my chair at the television, but that is simply the consequence of watching a show that challenges me, rather than offer cheap amusement.

SFU may take a while to get into, but the rewards are bountiful.

StevenCouras 20 March 2009

I started watching this show cause it was on cable HBO on-demand a few months ago. I always heard good things about it. Plus I figured HBO has provided me with some of my favorite shows in the past few years (Entourage, The Sapranos, True Blood) so this should be pretty good.

The show came out while I was in college, where we had no cable since I lived on campus but my friends and stuff that went home on the weekends raved about this show.

So needless to say I gave it a try. I was hooked…every month HBO on demand would give us 7 new episodes and I would watch them all within the first 3 days.

4 months later I was up to the first half of season 4. Finishing those episodes pretty fast I went online and started watching the second half and all of season 5 online cause I could not stop, I was SO hooked.

I just finished watching the final episode… WOW.

This show came full circle and ended so perfectly. Watching all 5 seasons, I was moved. The final 8 minutes I watched 4 times cause it was done so well, I was moved… I lost a best friend of mine a year ago to a tragic accident. I think about her every day. Death has always scared me, its my biggest fear and watching this show sometimes made me go nuts with all the analyzing of death and life but I still watched and sometimes it made me feel better and gave me some perspective on the subject.

I really related a lot to the character of Nate. He reminds me of me in a lot of ways and I liked Clair also but towards the end of the series I fully understood each character, their pain, their lives, everything… I have family and friends just like them, we all do.

This show really captures life. The bad and the good… and the really bad…and the moments in between.

I am 26 years old, and I don't think their will ever be another show like this on TV ever again. I am even a little bit sad that I wont be keeping tabs on the Fisher family and their friends ever again now that the show is over.

"Everyone, Everything, Everywhere, ends" and so did Six Feet Under.

Thank you to the writers, producers, director, and actors for making this important show about life and death. It helped me in some ways with my own views on death and life…Thank you.

Bgb217 8 May 2002

It's hard to describe to those who haven't watched this brilliant show what it's like. Six Feet Under is simply in my opinion, the best hour on television, and one of the best shows ever. Of all time. Brilliantly written, brilliantly told, brilliantly acted, brilliantly brilliant. I've never used brilliant so much in a review before.

First off, it's a show about a very real family, with very real issues to deal with. The family, who have just recently lost the father consists of the mother Ruth, two sons Nate and David, and sister Claire. The two brothers run the business prviously owned by the father, a funeral parlor. I just love this show. There is not a single bad actor on the show, in every role. The family is probably one of the most real ever portrayed on TV, the characters being all easily relatable to, I myself can relate to two of them in particular. It's fresh, at times funny, at times sad, at times everything. Every single actor is amazing in their roles from Brenda to David to Keith to Ruth to Frederico to everybody. And the story lines are just so brilliant, dealing with life and it's purpose, seen throught the eyes of these people who work with death in a funeral home. It's just amazing.

I could rave on and on for hours about how great this show is and how much I love it, but I have to stop sometime. If you haven't yet watched Six Feet Under please do yourself a favor and do. I love it and it's one of my all time favorite shows. Simply, yes, you guessed it, brilliant.

plumberguy66 26 March 2002

As I was reading through the comments about Six Feet Under I was struck by how many people expressed how this series made them FEEL. And how many people admitted to tearing up or even crying while watching the show. I admit I have done the same.

From the very beginning …no before that… From the moment I heard that Six Feet Under was created by Alan Ball, I knew I would like this show. I figured how could the maker of American Beauty go wrong? Boy am I glad I figured that.

To some degree I can relate to all of the characters on the show. And that speaks volumes because all of the characters on the show are kinda messed up in the head. And that is what I think speaks to so many people. I mean before Donahue was the most popular show on TV, I don't think most Americans even knew the word ‘dysfunctional' as applied to the family unit. Then it seemed a badge of honor to wear. And it was ok to go about telling people that you are from a dysfunctional family just to be ‘in'. Now after all this time and openness about our dysfunction, we begin to see how very much alike we all are. And that I feel is one of the binding elements of the watchers to this program. We sit each week and watch, basically, a part of ourselves work through personal issues, prejudices and shortcomings. Not always pretty, not always successfully but always openly, to us, the viewers. For me, to watch these characters struggle through some of their problems (which usually make mine look like a day at the beach) and let us come along with them to learn about their weaknesses and fallibilities and humanness is a lot like therapy for me. And in the end it only costs the subscription rate for HBO (no, I don't work for them).

I have never been that attached to the boob-tube (my father's word for the television) before. I have never had a reason to be. The programs that where on never more that mildly held my attention until now. I HATE commercials, I think they speak down to the public. So now I have no excuses and for that I am grateful.

Bottom line: I'm looking forward to the next few sessions… uhm I mean seasons. That's my take, what's yours?

morphion2 2 November 2005

Screenwriter Alan Ball is most well-known for his 1999 film debut American Beauty (directed by another first-timer, England's Sam Mendes). His first work was a stunning success, captivating audiences all over the world and winning five Academy Awards. In 2001, the pilot for Ball's first television series Six Feet Under aired. While being considerably darker than audiences might have expected, the series soon found its fan base and secured a place in the list of all time greats.

The show revolves around the Fishers, a rather isolated and dysfunctional family who run their own independent funeral home, and whose eldest son Nate (Peter Krause) is reunited with them in the wake of his father's untimely death. Once he is home, Nate learns that he has inherited the family business with his gay brother David (Michael C. Hall) and he has to learn how to again become a part of this bizarre family. Meanwhile, David, we learn, is struggling to reconcile his homosexuality with his home-taught Christian values, while his younger sister Claire (Lauren Ambrose) is forced to battle the hell of adolescence and the children's mother Ruth (Frances Conroy), a deeply devoted mother and wife, has to learn to face life without her husband. The complete first season sees the growth of the Fisher family as they slowly begin to disband their isolation and seek comfort, support and love from one another in the face of hardships and tragedy.

Six Feet Under is what every show should strive to be – it is intelligent, witty, sincere, realistic and completely unashamed to show the dark, painful side of life, without being depressing or nihilistic. It deals with an unfathomable amount of very significant issues, but on such a personal and relatable level that it doesn't even begin to feel preachy or self-important. It explores society's position on gays, women, young people, the elderly, the mentally ill and looks very openly at religion and death. A series of this standard is a surprise even from the production company that brought us Angels in America and The Sopranos.

One of the most fundamental principles for engaging an audience is to present engaging characters. Six Feet Under is a prime example: each character we're introduced to does take some getting used to, but all are wonderfully rich and complex and three-dimensional, balanced nicely by each other. Not only the Fishers but all their friends, acquaintances and lovers are well-developed, highly-involved and important to the show in its many layers. Nate's girlfriend Brenda (Rachael Griffiths) and her manic-depressive brother Billy (Jeremy Sisto), David's boyfriend Keith (Mathew St. Patrick) and the Fishers' Puerto Rican employee Rico (Freddy Rodriguez) are all fantastic characters that do far more than just complement the show's funeral home family.

Alan Ball is a truly gifted writer and an even more amazing artist; his ability to create such a delightfully unique environment and then to build on that environment to such incredible heights is nothing short of genius. His signature style of dark humor is one of the best things about Six Feet Under; even in a show about such somber and sometimes even morbid material, laughter is not uncommon, as he is able to recognize that there is more to life than pain. Ball has, within 2 short years, proved that he is one of Hollywood's most talented minds, and we can all look forward to further work from him.

More than any other television series in history, Six Feet Under is a

DSchrute 18 June 2008

Having just watched the series finale I sit here at my work desk unable to cope with the "real world". What can I find now that will fill the void left by this deeply moving and profound masterpiece?

SFU deals with many taboo life events and leaves one with a sense of empathy and sheer admiration at how beautifully the writers roll up their sleeves and sully their hands with topics such as incest and drug abuse.

Having recently experienced the death of my own father I can honestly say SFU invoked feelings and emotional responses that I didn't realise I was capable of experiencing. I would even go as far to say it has helped me identify and ultimately cope with my own loss.

Superb characters, inspired story lines and a thoughtful soundtrack make SFU easily the best TV programme I have ever watched (and I have watched a lot of TV in my 30 odd years).

I make no apologies when I raise my hand to my heart and honestly state that watching SFU has put a new perspective on my life and made me a better person.

Congratulations America for making this superbly refreshing and often dark masterpiece.

aabonander 27 January 2021

I watched Six Feet Under when it originally aired on HBO. Hard to believe that was almost 20 years ago. At the time I remember thinking this was the best thing I'd ever seen on television. It was too good for television. It just transcended anything I had ever seen. Over the years I've recommended the show to countless others. After recommending it to another friend recently I decided to rewatch the show. I finished the series in less than two weeks and it is still one of the best things I've ever seen on TV. The effect this show has on me is even more profound today than it was the first time I watched it. This show punches you in the gut. It makes you think. It makes you reflect. It makes you question your choices. It makes you evaluate life. A lot of incredibly great television series have come along since Six Feet Under originally aired but none of them will hit you as deep as this show.

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