Trainwreck: Woodstock '99 Poster

Trainwreck: Woodstock '99 (2022)

Documentary | Music 
Rayting:   7.5/10 6.4K votes
Country: USA
Language: English

Woodstock 1969 promised peace and music, but its '99 revival delivered days of rage, riots and real harm. Why did it go so horribly wrong?

Episode Guide

Best Trainwreck: Woodstock '99 Episodes

Top 20 (Ranked)

August 3, 2022star7.9 228 votesS1E2 Kerosene. Match. Boom!
August 3, 2022star7.7 214 votesS1E3 You Can't Stop a Riot in the 90s
August 3, 2022star7.6 278 votesS1E1 How the F**k Did This Happen?

Trainwreck: Woodstock '99 Trailer

User Reviews

ops-52535 4 August 2022

deneme bonusu veren siteler 2022. And i wouldve binged it strait, even though im a grumpy old man, cause ive always loved going on gigs, feeling the jolts, push and vibrations of the live music in my body(guns n' roses and imagine dragon are my latest in stavanger and koengen,bergen), and i feel lucky and kinda sainted that the security plans are working out, and that nightmares like shown in this documentary of the cataclysmic end of the woodstock festival 1999 have flown into my mind as worst case scenarios(me and spouce always have a security brief when on 40-60000 gigs, being most scared of fires and shooting), and i really hope that this incident unfolding 23 years ago stands as a pilar in the security campus curricullum.

So now having shared the moments with the 0,01 percentile of young and some crazy delinquents of the american population who actually where there, i feel just exhausted and numb and think that any other production of its kind will be a huge anticlimax...yes...so good is this production, so if you feel trainwrecked or not ,this is a must see documentary, its just massive!!!!! And to the creators of this mayhem production, make more of its kind there are loads of incidents to grab from.

ops-52535 4 August 2022

And i wouldve binged it strait, even though im a grumpy old man, cause ive always loved going on gigs, feeling the jolts, push and vibrations of the live music in my body(guns n' roses and imagine dragon are my latest in stavanger and koengen,bergen), and i feel lucky and kinda sainted that the security plans are working out, and that nightmares like shown in this documentary of the cataclysmic end of the woodstock festival 1999 have flown into my mind as worst case scenarios(me and spouce always have a security brief when on 40-60000 gigs, being most scared of fires and shooting), and i really hope that this incident unfolding 23 years ago stands as a pilar in the security campus curricullum.

So now having shared the moments with the 0,01 percentile of young and some crazy delinquents of the american population who actually where there, i feel just exhausted and numb and think that any other production of its kind will be a huge anticlimax...yes...so good is this production, so if you feel trainwrecked or not ,this is a must see documentary, its just massive!!!!! And to the creators of this mayhem production, make more of its kind there are loads of incidents to grab from.

cathyisa 5 August 2022

Trainwreck: Woodstock '99 watchseries. It develops as an apocalypse anouncement. The conditions of this festival resemble a mix between Mad Max and Spring Breakers. The sexual agressiveness and the hate that you see in those images are overwhelming.

A good watch for those who want to organise a festival on what NOT to do and what is crucial to have onsite.

And just because Woodstock is in the title it does not mean the crowd are hippies... The organisers were so naive and Lang was so careless and uninterested.

peterkowalski 3 August 2022

Let's just say it right now and get it over with - Trainwreck: Woodstock 99 is easily one of the best documentaries Netflix nas come up with in recent years; it's partly because most of those has been utter crap, but in a way, Trainwreck can really hold up its own. And if you're a fan of seeing things go south (and you are, aren't you, why else would you be here?), then you'll enjoy every bit of this one.

But of course, Oscar for best documentary short contender this one is not. And it isn't for the lack of trying - it's properly produced, nicely put together, with a clear vision almost till the end. Because -much like the event it's trying to portray- it's towards the end where things really start to fall apart. Are there repercussions? Ramifications? What do we really feel about the festival, 20+ years later? Have we learned anything or, was this documentary -again, much like the event- just an excuse to see s#it burn? Is saying, no plans for another Woodstock, really it?

A good documentary is a pure and simple art form - it's a music piece, an opera. It must come together effortlessly and it must make sense from the start till the end - here, you're left with an unfinished symphony. Unless this has always been the idea. Much unlike the even it's trying to portray.

arungeorge13 4 August 2022

Ahh, the late '90s. Such a wild time. The rise of nu metal and the rising popularity of alt rock. That was the first time I got introduced to the likes of RHCP, KoRn, Limp Bizkit, and all those names. At a time when popular music was perceived to be soft (and focused primarily on positive feelings alone), these guys who screamed at the top of their lungs delving into deep, inner levels of anguish and distress became more relatable to the average youngster. Back then, there were no smartphones or social media where you incessantly receive validation from. Life was simpler, but it was also still heavily focused around the male gaze (in everything pop culture - and music was no different).

Now, we can't blame the team of Woodstock in their attempt to revive a classic music festival which symbolized peace, love, and harmony in trying times. But the makers of this three-part documentary run us through the finer details - we get to know early on that Woodstock '99 was never meant to work in the first place because it was an attempt at cash-grab with no real sense of organization, safety, security, personal hygiene, or sanitation. You can put big names on a poster and expect people to attend in droves, though no one would remember a show if the music alone was decent.

What makes a days-long concert memorable is firstly of course, the music and its presentation (stage setup, sound systems, pyro etc.). Then comes the F&B, decent sanitary facilities and so on. But more importantly, you coming out alive and healthy at the end of it all is what matters the most (Astroworld and many recent incidents come to mind). Woodstock '99 probably only worked in one aspect alone - getting thousands of people to a single spot all in the name of music (and drugs, and hopes of getting laid, etcetera). Everything else seems like a natural clusterfuck - the choice of location, the ultra expensive food & beverages, the main acts themselves which were focused around riling people up (than calming them down), the lack of a proper security system, and riotous crowds acting like they were ready to raise hell any moment.

It's insane to still see part of the Woodstock team (the OGs i.e.) continuing to blame a few bad apples and not admit how criminally chaotic things got. I'm glad the documentary brings these things to light with crazy footage, insights from people who ran the event and who attended it, and also including the perspective of some of the musicians (good to see you, JD!). If you watched the more recent Fyre Festival documentary and found that amusing, then this one will certainly grab your interest and maybe, even make you look up more content on this infamous event.

jldivelbiss 3 August 2022

The producers of this event are ego, money-hungry maniacs. My dad always told me growing up that if someone is blaming other people consistently, to look at them closely, because there is a reason they are pointing to everyone but themselves. Sort of like wolves in sheep's clothing but these guys are all about taking money from the sheep.

Sidenote: it was cool to see some bands that I grew up with and then promptly realizing I don't miss those days at all.

chunkylefunga 6 August 2022

The original Woodstock was a cultural turning point, Woodstock 99 was also a turning point but in the opposite direction.

It's clear from the start that Lang doesn't know what he's doing and that it was only will hardwork of his 3 partners for the original Woodstock that it actually work. Without them Woodstock 99 failed.

John Scher defending all the rapes (especially of children) was just sickening, what an absolute disgrace of a human being.

The tried to capture the hippy magic of the original but then decided to play metal/rock/aggressive musics/bands, so obviously that's not going to bring in a hippy band. They you don't do the festival in a field/farm, the idiots decide to do it on asphalt in 40C heat. Banning drinking being brought in was ridiculous and letting a bottle of water go for $15 (in today's money) was just an absolute joke. No wonder people were kicking off.

The original Woodstock wasn't about money and it had even less regulations and security. People were giving out their food and drink for free. Woodstock 99 you'd be lucky to get a slice of bread for less than $5.

I'm glad they didn't do any other Woodstocks after this as Lang clearly was riding on the coattails of his original peers, and the greedy corporates pigs as responsible for it's death. Thank God Glastonbury still knows how to do it right.

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